Hawthorn Garden

Sometimes the smaller scale projects inspire the most innovative design solutions. This Hawthorn garden, designed in conjunction with Neil Architecture is a prime example.

The garden had its many challenges, from tight narrow boundary beds to shallow roof garden planters. Vertical creepers and rich swathes of foliage were the solution.

landscape-higgins
dsc_7610

 Corners of the courtyard are utilised as breakout zones, maximising space and making it the perfect spot for outdoor entertaining or a quiet read.

dsc_7627

Lush Boston Ivy and Fine Mat Rush tempers straight edges and the raw textures of brick and limestone paving.

dsc_7673

A double-sided fireplace provides warmth to two sitting areas. It elegantly frames the larger outdoor room for family gatherings and the smaller more intimate space off the studio.

vertical-photos-higgins-1

By integrating greenery throughout the barbeque area, the functional cooking space and part-time bench top seamlessly blends into the vibrant garden wall. Functionality does not have to come at the cost of good design or a beautiful garden.

vertical-photos-template-higgins2

Narrow garden beds hold multiple planting layers of Fine Leaf Mat Rush, Sacred Bamboo, Smoke Bush, Cut Leaf Birch and of course, Boston Ivy. Who said tight garden beds are too limiting.

vertical-photos-template-higgins-3

Along the entrance path sacred bamboo shows off its many qualities. Starting with green pinnate foliage with white flower spikes, eventually changing to bright red berries that pop against the neutral paving.

Bigger is not necessarily better. With well-considered plantings and lovely raw materials this garden is low maintenance, inviting and most importantly enjoyed by the whole family.