Indoor Greening

It’s amazing the difference adding a little green can make to an office or home environment.

Not only do the plants look great but they can help relieve stress and increase productivity, all while providing a refreshing transformation to the space.  

Here are a few of our favourite indoor plants that are currently living in the E-GA office, and how you can use them to revive your indoor space.   

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Monstera deliciosa 

What you can do I can do better!  We have this Monstera draping over our office entrance to welcome visitors, tucked away in a well lit bulkhead to grow along the building truss.

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Philodendron ‘Xanadu’

A widely used outdoor plant in NSW, the P. ‘Xanadu’ is a great smaller potted indoor plant to have on a desk or in a shelf space.

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Philodendron selloum

With it’s huge glossy leaves, the P.selloum makes for a bold statement in a well lit corner.

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Ficus lyrata

Size matters! Not only are the leaves of the Fiddle-leaf Fig oversized, but they can also be found as advanced trees if you have the right space and position.

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Philodendron scandens

This is our indoor replacement for Virginian Creeper.  Using wires to control it’s growth direction on a single leader, this rambling climber will take off and provide vertical interest.

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Ficus alii

Not your normal indoor plant, the Alii Fig has a narrow blade leaf which gives a softness to the otherwise bold leaf forms of most indoor plants.  Great against a bold coloured wall to let the foliage colour come through.

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Zamioculcas zamiifolia (left)

Crassula ovata (right)

Clumping indoor plants and like minded pots can work well as work station dividers.  The ZZ plant would be a permanent plant as it loves neglect where the Jade Plant will need the odd break outdoor.

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Combinations and layering can create plenty of interest and give you a full garden indoors.  Mix up the pots to give a hit of colour.  Here we have used recycled 20lt oil cans.

We also regularly use pots supplied from Martin Kellock and Tait.